Submit Paper online | IJSRD Journal – Feb 2018


Submit Paper online | #IJSRD #journal
February 2k18 Vol. 5 Issue 12
High Impact Factor: 4.396 | IC Value: 66.68 (New)
India’s leading Open Access peer reviewed International Online journal for Science & Engineering Student & Technologies manuscript.

For More Information Please Visit @ http://www.ijsrd.com

Submit Paper online | IJSRD journal | February 2k18 Vol. 5 Issue 12 | Open Access peer reviewed | International Online journal | Science Student Engineering

Submit Paper online | #IJSRD #journal #February #2k18 Vol. 5 Issue 12

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IJSRD & TechFest 2014-15 (IIT-Bombay) presents TISC(Conference)


Featured imageIJSRD is pleased to inform you that IIT Bombay presents Asia’s Largest Science and Technology Festival. TISC(Conference) event is supported by IJSRD. Techfest International Student Conference is an initiative to bring together the student community and professors with a common research background. TISC marks a step further in our endeavor to promote science and technology among the students by facilitating the exchange of knowledge between academia and industry. For more details, please visit the following link: www.techfest.org/conference

Featured image

IJSRD is a leading e-journal, under which we are encouraging and exploring newer ideas of current trends in Engineering and Science by publishing papers containing pure knowledge. IJSRD is mainly started to help researching peers belongs to Undergraduate, Postgraduate and Research students. IJSRD aims to cover the latest outstanding development in the fields of Engineering and Technologies.For submitting paper online, click here: Submit Manuscript Online

ISSN (Online) : 2321-0613
Subject Category : Engineering Science and Technology
Frequency : Monthly, 12 issues per year
Published by : I.J.S.R.D. , INDIA
Impact Factor : 1.26

#IJSRD | Wireless Phone Charger: the uniqueness and the features


Wowhoo Wireless Phone Charger: the uniqueness and the features
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Major wireless phone carriers have all been adapting the Qi wireless technology. Additionally many car manufactures are adding them to their 2014-2015 models. Manufactures include but are not limited to the following: Jeep, Toyota, Prius Harrier, Mercedes Benz, BMW, Volkswagen, Audi aswell as Porsche.

Due to the new and improved design and usability our initial launch date has been revised from Jan 7th to March 1st. we added approximately 8mm to our diameter to allow a better internal design.  The small revision to the Wowhoo charger allow us to get that quicker charge which is most important. The 10% is a big jump in charging speed.

Invention Awards 2014: A Personal Electric Airplane That Won’t Need A Runway | Research lets do it…


More than half of all personal aircraft accidents occur during takeoffs or landings. That’s why inventor and entrepreneur JoeBen Bevirt—known for designing airplane-like wind energy turbines—is intent on making runways obsolete. Bevirt, 40, has mobilized his wind energy team to create a personal electric airplane called S2 that takes off vertically, like a helicopter, and flies aerodynamically, like an airplane.

invention awards_plane

to view main article click here
Research lets Do it. . . #IJSRD

No full-scale prototype exists yet, but Bevirt and his team have built about two dozen 10-pound models to demonstrate their concept works. NASA has taken notice and is now funding the development of a 55-pound unmanned aerial vehicle. Supercomputer simulations of a full-scale, 1,700-pound S2 suggest it could fly two people about 200 miles (New York City to Boston) in an hour on 50 kilowatt-hours of electricity, or roughly equivalent to 1.5 gallons of fuel used by a typical two-seat airplane—which would make the new aircraft about five times more efficient.

FLEXIBILITY

Retractable arms reposition the motors to transition between vertical takeoff, forward flight, and landing.

Research Lets Do it. . . #IJSRD

Fusion Reactor Concept Could Be Cheaper Than Coal


University of Washington
Summary:
Engineers have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.
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Research . .  ? ?  Lets Do IT… #IJSRD

Fusion energy almost sounds too good to be true — zero greenhouse gas emissions, no long-lived radioactive waste, a nearly unlimited fuel supply.

Perhaps the biggest roadblock to adopting fusion energy is that the economics haven’t penciled out. Fusion power designs aren’t cheap enough to outperform systems that use fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas.

IJSRD is a leading e-journal, under which we are encouraging and exploring newer ideas of current trends in Engineering and Science by publishing papers containing pure knowledge.

University of Washington engineers hope to change that. They have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.

The team published its reactor design and cost-analysis findings last spring and will present results Oct. 17 at the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Fusion Energy Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia.

“Right now, this design has the greatest potential of producing economical fusion power of any current concept,” said Thomas Jarboe, a UW professor of aeronautics and astronautics and an adjunct professor in physics.

The UW’s reactor, called the dynomak, started as a class project taught by Jarboe two years ago. After the class ended, Jarboe and doctoral student Derek Sutherland — who previously worked on a reactor design at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — continued to develop and refine the concept.

The design builds on existing technology and creates a magnetic field within a closed space to hold plasma in place long enough for fusion to occur, allowing the hot plasma to react and burn. The reactor itself would be largely self-sustaining, meaning it would continuously heat the plasma to maintain thermonuclear conditions. Heat generated from the reactor would heat up a coolant that is used to spin a turbine and generate electricity, similar to how a typical power reactor works.

“This is a much more elegant solution because the medium in which you generate fusion is the medium in which you’re also driving all the current required to confine it,” Sutherland said.

There are several ways to create a magnetic field, which is crucial to keeping a fusion reactor going. The UW’s design is known as a spheromak, meaning it generates the majority of magnetic fields by driving electrical currents into the plasma itself. This reduces the amount of required materials and actually allows researchers to shrink the overall size of the reactor.

Other designs, such as the experimental fusion reactor project that’s currently being built in France — called Iter — have to be much larger than the UW’s because they rely on superconducting coils that circle around the outside of the device to provide a similar magnetic field. When compared with the fusion reactor concept in France, the UW’s is much less expensive — roughly one-tenth the cost of Iter — while producing five times the amount of energy.

The UW researchers factored the cost of building a fusion reactor power plant using their design and compared that with building a coal power plant. They used a metric called “overnight capital costs,” which includes all costs, particularly startup infrastructure fees. A fusion power plant producing 1 gigawatt (1 billion watts) of power would cost $2.7 billion, while a coal plant of the same output would cost $2.8 billion, according to their analysis.

“If we do invest in this type of fusion, we could be rewarded because the commercial reactor unit already looks economical,” Sutherland said. “It’s very exciting.”

Right now, the UW’s concept is about one-tenth the size and power output of a final product, which is still years away. The researchers have successfully tested the prototype’s ability to sustain a plasma efficiently, and as they further develop and expand the size of the device they can ramp up to higher-temperature plasma and get significant fusion power output.

The team has filed patents on the reactor concept with the UW’s Center for Commercialization and plans to continue developing and scaling up its prototypes.

Other members of the UW design team include Kyle Morgan of physics; Eric Lavine, Michal Hughes, George Marklin, Chris Hansen, Brian Victor, Michael Pfaff, and Aaron Hossack of aeronautics and astronautics; Brian Nelson of electrical engineering; and, Yu Kamikawa and Phillip Andrist formerly of the UW.

The research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

For more detail click here.

Robotic solutions inspired by plants | #IJSRD


EU-funded researchers are demonstrating revolutionary robotic techniques inspired by plants, featuring a 3D-printed ‘trunk’, ‘leaves’ that sense the environment and ‘roots’ that grow and change direction.

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Lets Research !!! DO IT >>>> IJSRD

Humans naturally understand problems and solutions from an animal’s perspective, tending to see plants as passive organisms that don’t ‘do’ much of anything, but plants do move, and they sense, and they do so in extremely efficient ways.

Barbara Mazzolai of the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) coordinates the FP7 — PLANTOID project, funded via the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) scheme. She says humans can learn a lot from plants. ‘Our aim is to design, prototype and validate a new generation of ICT hardware and software technologies inspired by plants.’ And she sees potential applications for such technologies in agriculture, medicine and even space exploration.

The PLANTOID prototype was designed with two functional roots: one root demonstrates bending capabilities, responding to input from the sensors at the tip of the root. This way the root is bending away from a stumbling block or aggressive or toxic products. A second root demonstrates artificial growth. ‘Layers of new material are deposited near the tip of the root to produce a motive force, penetrating the soil,’ Mazzolai explains. Practically, the robot grows by building its own structure and penetrates the soil.

The roots are connected to a trunk housing a micro-computer. The trunk itself is made of plastic and was produced using a 3D printer. Finally, just like natural leaves, the ‘leaves’ of the PLANTOID robot include sensors that can assess environmental conditions, including temperature, humidity, gravity, touch, and chemical factors.

Unique design exploiting unique plant properties

Backed by EUR 1.6 million of EU funding, the PLANTOID project is the first to design and develop robotic solutions based on plant models. The prototype is not meant to serve a particular application as such, but represents a demonstration of new robotic techniques. However, Mazzolai says real-life applications in the future could include detection and assessment of pollutant concentrations, e.g. heavy metals, or nutrients in the environment, as well as mapping and monitoring of conditions in terrestrial soils.

Indeed, plant-like robots could be uniquely suited to space exploration, able to dig and implant themselves on alien worlds, following sensory leads while adapting to potentially harsh external conditions.

Other promising applications could include flexible endoscopic robots for delicate surgical applications in the medical field, while larger plant-like robots could be of use in search and rescue operations, for example after a natural disaster.

‘Plants are very efficient in terms of their energy consumption during motion,’ says Mazzolai, ‘and this suggests many approaches that are muscle-free and thus not necessarily animal-like for the world of robotics.’ Indeed, the unique characteristics of plants could become a source of inspiration for new companies that can produce smart and useful plant-like robotic devices.